kateoplis:

Politico: Why SOPA is on the Congressional agenda

Hollywood’s in a showdown over its TV shows, movies and music with an up-and-coming opponent in the Washington arena: the Silicon Valley gang.
And that can only mean a huge payday for lobbyists.
According to figures compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics, the film, music and TV industries have spent more than $91 million on lobbying so far this year — an amount that puts them on pace to beat all of their previous spending records. 

Tell Them No

kateoplis:

Politico: Why SOPA is on the Congressional agenda

Hollywood’s in a showdown over its TV shows, movies and music with an up-and-coming opponent in the Washington arena: the Silicon Valley gang.

And that can only mean a huge payday for lobbyists.

According to figures compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics, the film, music and TV industries have spent more than $91 million on lobbying so far this year — an amount that puts them on pace to beat all of their previous spending records. 

(via sunfoundation)

Not sure if this is making sense…  Showing Indium to be depleted in 5-10 years if “demand grows.”  Grows to what?  That’s seems vague; Great concept but data needs to relevant to the present situation to be most effective.
-nh

ecoevolution:

This infographic shows current consumption rates of various natural resources and provides a timeline estimating when we will run out of them if we don’t become more sustainable. It demonstrates the impacts of American consumption, in particular, and notes where we’d be if the rest of the world consumed resources at just half the rate of the US. Data compiled by by Armin Reller of the University of Augsburg and Tom Graedel of Yale University, graphic created by NewScientist.

Not sure if this is making sense…  Showing Indium to be depleted in 5-10 years if “demand grows.”  Grows to what?  That’s seems vague; Great concept but data needs to relevant to the present situation to be most effective.

-nh

ecoevolution:

This infographic shows current consumption rates of various natural resources and provides a timeline estimating when we will run out of them if we don’t become more sustainable. It demonstrates the impacts of American consumption, in particular, and notes where we’d be if the rest of the world consumed resources at just half the rate of the US. 

Data compiled by by Armin Reller of the University of Augsburg and Tom Graedel of Yale University, graphic created by NewScientist.